Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for July, 2011

[blog under construction]

Awhile back, I received a blog comment [located below my blog] from a high official in the EFCI denomination (Evangelical Friends Church International). Defending the EFCI’s practicing Spiritual Formation, this official wrote:

Spiritual formation is simply the study of and the pursuit of how people grow spiritually. I think that is the heart of the holiness movement, of which we are still a part. We work with the Nazarenes and Free Methodists to publish common curriculum that is widely used for Sunday Schools, VBS’s, and the like.

[In the above quote, I emphasized certain points by bolding.]

My response is, first of all, Spiritual Formation is much more than this EFCI official claims – it includes the occultish spiritual discipline of Contemplative Prayer/Contemplative Spirituality. Second, it is shocking to hear this person imply that Spiritual Formation (which EFCI pastor Richard Foster popularized in 1978) is now considered “the heart” of the Holiness Movement.  Third, the EFCI may still be a part of what is now  considered the Holiness Movement, but the Holiness Movement today is far different from what the Holiness Movement was 100 years ago (1).

Several days ago, I discovered the publisher of the “common curriculum” that Dr. Evans referred to above.  The EFCI and other Holiness denominations get curriculum from WordAction.

Following is the title of the WordAction website:

WordAction: Innovative Biblical Solutions in Christian Education for the Changing Church

Note the website title above says “Innovative” Biblical Solutions … for the Changing Church.” By “innovative” they obviously mean “new ways of doing church.” And by “the Changing Church” they mean “the  Emerging/Emergent Church movement.”

Note the  list of Holiness denominations, under their About Us link:

WordAction Publishing Company is a not-for-profit organization that provides relevant Sunday School curriculum and small group materials to enable people of all ages to discover God’s Word. Our resources are designed through the cooperative efforts of The Salvation Army, Church of the Nazarene, Wesleyans, Evangelical Friends, Free Methodists, and Evangelical United Methodists. WordAction is a part of the Nazarene Publishing House and has become the largest publisher of Wesleyan-Holiness Sunday School curriculum in the world.

I guess the term “Wesleyan-Holiness” doesn’t mean anything anymore. Unless it means a denomination that USED to be Wesleyan-Holiness at some time in its past. The denominations listed above have all strayed from their biblically sound roots, as Googling them can quickly determine.

Another point about WordAction: the youth materials they list come from the heretical Barefoot Ministries, with materials sold through the WordAction website (click on Youth and scroll to the bottom left). There have been a number of critiques written exposing the Emerging/Emergent agenda of Barefoot Ministries for the youth of Holiness denominations.

I hope to write a separate blog about Barefoot Ministries. For now, here are links to a few critiques:

http://www.gcmin.org/veritas/v002:credo.pdf

http://exnazarene.wordpress.com/2010/10/28/immerse-another-tool-by-barefoot-ministries-to-promote-the-leftistliberalemergent-agenda/

ENDNOTES

(1) Holiness denominations of 1911 were Fundamentalist. That is, they adhered to The Fundamentals, a series of articles published between 1910-1915. Holiness denominations of 2011 are, for the most part, either New Evangelical or Emerging/Emergent. I would daresay, in terms of the Fundamentalist-Modernist controversy of the 20th century, the Holiness denominations of 2011 are closer to being Modernist than Fundamentalist. Why do I say this? Because there is little difference between New Evangelical and Emerging. And the line between Emerging and Emergent is becoming more and more blurred. And, “Emergent” is nearly synonymous with “Modernist.” Shocking! [I hope to explore this 1911/2011 dichotomy further in a future blog.]

The following article claims that Christianity today still adheres for the most part to The Fundamentals of 1910-1915. Hogwash!:

http://www.patheos.com/Resources/Additional-Resources/Evangelicalism-Standing-the-Test-of-Time-Thomas-Kidd.html

Note that the above website is far from being born again Christian – as the following list of  “featured experts” shows:

http://experts.patheos.com/

Read Full Post »

This content is password protected. To view it please enter your password below:

Read Full Post »

[blog under construction]

I am copying and pasting a blog verbatim, showing the Emerging/Emergent Church’s heretical view of evangelism. I have emphasized certain points by bolding, and added comments in [bracketing].  Click here for the original blog.

Note – I would say Emerging/Emergent individuals lie on a spectrum regarding their view of salvation through Christ. The following blog describes individuals that are toward the Emergent, non-believer end of the spectrum. Not only do they abhor the idea of preaching sin, hell and damnation. They do not even hold to the belief that Jesus is the only Way to Heaven (as is taught in John Chapter 3).

Here is the blog:

Does the Emerging church have a problem with evangelism?

3 April, 2006

Sitting around with a group of leaders in the early days of the Emerging church. Talking about reinventing the church for the postmodern context etc.

This floors me: “You know we’re just not reaching postmoderns. Maybe it’s like reaching Muslims. We could spend a whole lifetime and hardly see any new believers.”

Shocked because I’m talking to the people who are leading and training others in how to do church.

This statement attributed to Stuart Murray-Williams: “So far, emerging churches have had limited success, particularly in evangelism and helping those unchurched people to enter into the church.”

This from Todd Hunter: “the movement as a whole (and most of its parts) is not doing a bang up job at evangelism.”

Does the Emerging church have a problem with evangelism? Depends what you mean by “evangelism.”

For the Emerging church described by Gibbs and Bolger, evangelism has more to do with presence than proclamation; more to do with lifestyle than words; more to do with engagement than conversion.

Attempts to convert others or to proclaim the truth with certainty are rejected. Evangelism is redefined as remaining open to God at work in other religions. Remaining open to being evangelised by other faiths.

The authors describe one Emerging evangelism project as “the reverse of most forms of evangelism. They visit people of other faiths and spiritualities and allow themselves to be evangelized in order to learn more about other walks of life.”

A leader explains, We deemphasize the idea that Christians have God and all others don’t by attempting to engage in open two-way conversations. . . . We are also genuinely open to being wrong about parts and perhaps all of our beliefs—while at the same time being fully committed to them.”

Another says, evangelism “is no longer about persuading people to believe what I believe. . . . It is more about shared experiences and encounters. It is about walking the journey of life and faith together, each distinct to his or her own tradition and culture but with the possibility of encountering God and truth from one another.”

Does the Emerging church have a problem with evangelism? Not if you redefine what evangelism is.

Now here’s the rub. With an understanding of evangelism like this, there is just no way you are going to reach people. But maybe that’s not the point anymore.

Additional articles about this issue:

The Inclusive Gospel: Commentary by Roger Oakland

Read Full Post »

« Newer Posts

%d bloggers like this: