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Archive for the ‘Evolutionary Christianity’ Category

In other blogs (for example, here, here, and here), I have written about the incredulous shift among many evangelicals from premillenialism to postmillenialism. There are several “streams” of postmillenialism. A few are 1) dominionist Reconstructionism, 2) dominionist Kingdom Now, and 3) Emerging/ Emergent “postmillenialism.” All streams of postmillenialism are merging as we head towards the One World Religion of the Antichrist.

I came across this excellent article by Sarah H. Leslie, which among other things discusses Emerging/Emergent eschatology. Berit Kjos has reposted this article on her website here. I have reposted the entire article below:

Part 5: The Emerging Church – Circa 1970   (See Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, Part 4, Part 6 )

Emerging Towards Convergence

By Sarah H. Leslie

http://herescope.blogspot.com  –  August 3, 2009

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by Discernment Group

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“After emergence comes emersion.”

—Teilhard de Chardin, The Phenomenon of Man (Harper, 1965), p. 309.


The Emergent/Emerging Church movement is heading towards a crash collision with the New Age movement. In fact, it may already be happening before our very eyes. The Discernment Research Group has reached the inescapable conclusion that this is intentional and it has been planned for over a generation.

In brief, there has been a crossover of personnel, organizations, doctrines, methods, and agendas going back at least 40-50 years. Constance Cumbey, who first exposed the New Age movement and its Theosophical roots in her groundbreaking book The Hidden Dangers of the Rainbow, has been writing a series of reports on the earliest examples of this crossover for her blog and her NewsWithViews.com column. Through our own research we have discovered that there was an earlier Emerging Church movement, which was initiated in the late 1960s and early 1970s, which bears remarkable resemblance, crossover and correlation to its newer counterpart. This early history is currently being recounted in an ongoing series of posts on the Herescope blog.[1]

We know that the current Emergent Church is a marketing phenomenon, set up as an official movement by Bob Buford’s Leadership Network, a historical fact which we documented in a series of Herescope posts in 2005 and 2006.[2] From its very inception in the 1980s Leadership Network imported a number of leading New Age business “gurus” as “experts” – holding nebulous (if any!) Christian credentials. They trained an entire generation of evangelical “leaders” on the latest tactics of psycho-social change theory, substituting it for genuine Holy Spirit revival. These business “gurus,” some of whom had open New Age beliefs, included such notables as Margaret Wheatley, Peter Drucker, Jim Collins, and Ken Blanchard. Many spoke at a 2000 Leadership Network conference “Exploring Off the Map” which launched the Emergent Church movement.[3]

From our research we also know that the Emergent Church was set up to be a vanguard, a forerunner, to propel the postmodern evangelical church towards a paradigm shift in theology, structure, methodology, and purpose. As such, it has been rushing headlong towards an open convergence with the New Age movement. Emergent leader Phyllis Tickle has termed this “The Great Emergence,” which is the title of her 2008 book announcing the “birthing” of a “brand-new expression of… faith and praxis” (p. 17) which will ultimately “rewrite Christian theology” (p. 162).

Important details about both the history and theology of the modern Emergent movement can be found in Pastor Bob DeWaay’s recently published book The Emergent Church: Undefining Christianity (2009). This book summarizes the basic doctrines and practices of the movement, and gives an account of a few key leaders.

Emergent Eschatology

Pastor DeWaay recognizes the defining issue for the Emergent movement as eschatology:

While Emergent Church leaders differ on nearly every Christian doctrine, one belief they hold in common—the one that unifies their movement—is their eschatology. Emergent theologians and church leaders reject God’s final judgment in favor of His saving of all humanity and creation into a tangible paradise in which all will participate. (p. 13)

This view of eschatology is also a key doctrine of Dominionism, and is therefore linked to the concept of “building the kingdom of God on earth.” This eschatological worldview proclaims that there isn’t going to be a Judgment Day, and teaches that man can facilitate the return to pre-Fall paradise conditions on Earth. This view of the future subliminates the Cross, ignores scriptural prophecies about the endtimes, and positions man into godlike status as a “co-creator.” Obviously, in such an eschatological scenario there is no Heaven nor Hell.

The Emergent paradigm shift is already happening. This eschatological worldview is now becoming widespread and is subtly being incorporated into most major “mainstream” evangelical ministries, missions, and organizations. A few examples we have noted on the Herescope blog include N.T. Wright,[4] the Lausanne movement,[5] Ralph Winter,[6] Transform World,[7] Dutch Sheets and Bill Hamon,[8] and many Latter Rain leaders.[9] Exemplifying this shift, a recent article in a publication called ConvergePoint, put out by the Baptist General Conference, describes this group’s transformation initiative in these terms, “My personal joy was compounded culturally by the fact that the word converge happens to appear in the Portuguese Bible in Ephesians 1:10: ‘…to make all things converge together in Christ, things in heaven and earth.’”[10]

This eschatological worldview has serious ramifications for all of Christian theology. DeWaay explains:

…[T]he possibility of future judgment and punishment of those who do not believe in Christ’s death on the cross and His shedding of blood to avert God’s wrath against sin is either denied or not discussed in Emergent/postmodern theology. (p. 149)

Theology of Hope?

Pastor DeWaay identifies Jürgen Moltmann’s book, Theology of Hope, first published in 1964, as a seminal document forming a foundation for the Emergent Church movement’s revisionist, evolutionary eschatology. Moltmann was influenced by Marxism and the philosophies of Georg W.F. Hegel. Moltmann’s eschatological “hope” is “headed toward the kingdom of God on earth with universal participation” (p. 23). DeWaay explains that “Emergent/postmodern theology is based on the Hegelian idea that contradictions synthesize into better future realities…. Moltmann took Hegel’s ideas and created a Christian alternative to Marxism (which is also based on Hegel’s philosophy) that he called a ‘theology of hope’” (p. 30). Emergent church leaders who hearken back to Moltmann include Brian McLaren, Doug Pagitt, Stanley Grenz and many others.

DeWaay makes the case that, according to the “theology of hope” promulgated by Moltmann and his Emergent disciples, “the truth will only be known with certainty in the future” (p. 39) Therefore, this uncertainty results in the corollary heresies that “God is re-creating the world now with our help” and “the world has a universally bright future with no pending, cataclysmic judgment” (p. 40).

Evolutionary Eschatology

The root theology undergirding all Emergent eschatology is evolution. A generation ago, certain Christian leaders took the ideas of Moltmann and began to fill in the outlines for his “theology of hope.” They also got their ideas from a group of so-called “secular” futurists, who happened to hold a Teilhardian evolutionary worldview.[11] Today we might classify these futurists as New Agers.

Modern Emergents hold a remarkably similar worldview to these early futurists. Phyllis Tickle, in her book The Great Emergence, writes approvingly of Darwin’s evolution theory, saying that it was “the tipping point that sent us careening off into new cultural, social, political, and theological territory” (p. 64).

While researching the early Emerging Church movement we came across a seminary theologian, Kenneth Cauthen, who wrote a book in 1971 entitled Christian Biopolitics: A Credo & Strategy for the Future (Abdingdon Press). It was the premise of Cauthen’s book that Jürgen Moltmann didn’t go far enough; that his “theology of hope” was incomplete because it was focused “too exclusively in the context of society and history and has neglected the natural and cosmic setting of the human enterprise” (p. 102). Cauthen proposed a “Christian biopolitics” – an “ecological principle” that would connect nature and society so that Moltmann’s “theology of hope” could become “cosmic.” He called for the “recognition of the centrality of an evolutionary perspective” (p. 109). We don’t know the full extent of Cauthen’s influence upon postmodern evangelicals, but the theological changes he anticipated bear remarkable resemblance to Emergent thought and practice today.

As a member of the World Future Society, a group formed in 1966 with strong ties to the New Age Theosophists, Cauthen articulated an “ecological model for politics and theology” (p. 106) that would facilitate a “transition” leading to global “transformation.” He proposed that “we take the New Testament conception of the consummated Kingdom of God as a symbol of the transcendent goal of history” (p. 131), a theology which would eliminate a future of either Heaven and Hell. And he suggested that “man is indeed becoming like a god…that science and technology are putting power into the hands of human beings that have traditionally been reserved for the gods” (p. 140). He summarized his views as follows:

The message of the church during this period of world transition should be framed in utopian-eschatological terms, stressing the power and purpose of the Divine Spirit to bring all men into the ecstatic joy of a New Age, while the ministry of the church is basically to create a community of persons who can cause, celebrate, and cope with the changes that are required to bring humanity into the promise of the planetary society. (p. 124)

Cauthen was not happy with Moltmann’s social gospel “theology of hope.” He said that was too connected to the here and now in building the kingdom of God on Earth. Cauthen proposed that Moltmann’s ideas needed a “cosmic” and “utopian” aspect that would give people a “magnificent vision of an ideal future” with a “new consciousness” that would prove to “be more sensuous, ecstatic, erotic, earthy, bodily oriented, festive, playful, feminine, idealistic, utopian, mystical, sacramental, hedonistic—in sum, a quest for joy in the wholeness of body and spirit” (p. 150). Amazingly, this is a pretty accurate picture of the modern Emergent Church’s quest for a better future.

To be continued….

The Truth:

“Who is there among you that feareth the LORD, that obeyeth the voice of his servant, that walketh in darkness, and hath no light? let him trust in the name of the LORD, and stay upon his God.” (Isaiah 50:10)



*Part 5 is excerpted from the Discernment Newsletter, July/August 2009 (Vol. 20, No. 4). Herescope will post the entire article as a series this week. The Herescope version will include additional documentation in the form of links added to the text and its quotations.

Endnotes:
1. See these Herescope posts:
http://herescope.blogspot.com/2009/05/emerging-church-circa-1970.html & http://herescope.blogspot.com/2009/05/early-experiential-emergents.html & http://herescope.blogspot.com/2009/06/retro-emergent.html &
http://herescope.blogspot.com/2009/07/new-thing.html
2. It is because of the documentation you will find in these posts that we can freely interchange the term Emergent and Emerging when discussing this movement: http://herescope.blogspot.com/2005/11/marketing-emergent.html & http://herescope.blogspot.com/2005/11/how-leadership-network-created.html & http://herescope.blogspot.com/2006/01/leadership-network-spawns-emergent.html & http://herescope.blogspot.com/2006/01/leadership-network-and-terra-nova.html & http://herescope.blogspot.com/2006/01/how-leadership-network-established.html
3. See http://herescope.blogspot.com/2005/10/christian-leaders-go-on-expedition.html & http://herescope.blogspot.com/2008/05/earth-old-story-new-story.html & http://www.leadnet.org/epubarchive.asp?id=30&db=archive_explorer & http://www.leadnet.org/epubarchive.asp?id=33&db=archive_explorer & http://www.leadnet.org/epubarchive.asp?id=84&db=archive_explorer
& https://www.leadnet.org/libarchive.asp?id=110&db=archive_champsupdate
4. “Heaven Is Not Our Home: The bodily resurrection is the good news of the gospel—and thus our social and political mandate,” N. T. Wright, Christianity Today, 3/24/08, http://www.christianitytoday.com/ct/2008/april/13.36.html See also: http://herescope.blogspot.com/2008/02/creating-heaven-on-earth.html which discusses this article.
5. Lausanne Committee for World Evangelization, Lausanne Occasional Paper No. 30: “Globalization and the Gospel: Rethinking Mission in the Contemporary World, 2004, http://www.lausanne.org/documents/2004forum/LOP30_IG1.pdf, states: “Gospel, or euvangelion, is understood in its fullest sense as the “good news” that Jesus Christ, the King of Heaven, has come, not only to save individuals from hell, but to restore his kingdom • which is nothing short of the entire world and all of creation. As we shall see, “globalization” leads us to consider anew the words of the Lord’s Prayer: “Father, thy will be done on Earth as it is in Heaven.” The mission of the church, accordingly, is to be a living sign to the world that its King has indeed come to restore his kingdom. In the words of the New Testament scholar, N. T. Wright, we are to be for the world what Jesus was for Israel — and, we are able to carry out our mission because of what Jesus did for Israel and the world. Understood this way, we are to be the King’s heralds announcing throughout the cities and outposts of the kingdom the “good news” that he has come, he has defeated the rebellious powers of sin and death, and through the power of his Spirit, and he is working through the church to put his world to rights.”
6. See the articles with documentation at http://herescope.blogspot.com/2007/07/secret-mission.html & http://herescope.blogspot.com/2008/04/tinker-with-theology-tinker-with-man.html & http://herescope.blogspot.com/2008/02/creating-heaven-on-earth.html & http://herescope.blogspot.com/2007/07/cultural-mandate.html
7. See the article posted at http://herescope.blogspot.com/2007/07/redeeming-cultures.html where the Transform World Covenant states: “Scope of the Gospel: As Creator, God is Lord of all, and, therefore, his redemptive concern is comprehensive—seeking to heal and restore ‘all things’ by means of Christ’s atoning sacrifice on the cross (Gen. 1:31a; Rom. 8:18-23; Col. 1:19-20). The church’s calling is to witness to the kingdom of God in its fullness (Matt. 4:23; Mark 1:15; Luke 4:18-21). To be faithful to the gospel the ministry of the body of Christ must be holistic—encompassing the whole person—spiritual, physical, and social, and all human relationships—with God, with others, and with the environment (Gen. 1:26-28). Anything less than concern for all spheres of life is to misrepresent the all-encompassing Lordship of Jesus Christ over the world.”
8. See the article posted at http://herescope.blogspot.com/2007/07/cultural-mandate.html and note that C. Peter Wagner ties this to Dominionism. Also see http://herescope.blogspot.com/2007/07/proposing-new-theology.html and the accompanying quotations that connect this eschatological worldview with the Manifest Sons of God cult.
9. See this article and note the Hermeticism evident in the “as above, so below” feature of this eschatology of building heaven on earth: http://herescope.blogspot.com/2007/07/as-in-heaven-so-on-earth.html
10. “What does ‘Converge’ mean?” Jerry Sheveland, ConvergePoint, Vol. 1, No. 3, April-May 2009, p. 12.
11. Pierre Teilhard de Chardin, the French Jesuit philosopher/priest, proposed that just as man had evolved from monkeys, there would be a new species of man that would EMERGE, which he called homo noeticus. His evolutionary beliefs form the foundation of the New Age movement. As nearly as we can tell, he was the first to use forms of the word “emerge” to describe the spiritual formation of this new species. Wikipedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Teilhard) accurately summarizes his beliefs as follows: “In his posthumously published book, The Phenomenon of Man, Teilhard writes of the unfolding of the material cosmos, from primordial particles to the development of life, human beings and the noosphere, and finally to his vision of the Omega Point in the future, which is ‘pulling’ all creation towards it. He was a leading proponent of orthogenesis, the idea that evolution occurs in a directional, goal driven way. To Teilhard, evolution unfolded from cell to organism to planet to solar system and whole-universe (see Gaia theory). Such theories are generally termed teleological views of evolution. Teilhard attempts to make sense of the universe by its evolutionary process. He interprets mankind as the axis of evolution into higher consciousness, and postulates that a supreme consciousness, God, must be drawing the universe towards him.”


© 2009 by Discernment Group

Source article: http://herescope.blogspot.com/2009/07/emergence-towards-convergence.html

*  *  *

Index to other articles by Discernment Group  

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I was researching various connections of Brian McLaren, and stumbled across yet another apostate movement: Evolutionary Christianity (AKA Evolutionary Spirituality). I get the impression that Evolutionary Christianity is very similar to Emergence Christianity, but with a “scientific” emphasis. Following are several links to Evolutionary Christianity websites.

This link lists 30 Evolutionary Christianity speakers (as of 12/5/10):

http://evolutionarychristianity.com/

Ian Barbour – Elder statesman in the science and religion movement. Awarded the Templeton Prize in 1999. Author of Myths, Models, and Paradigms; Religion in an Age of Science; and Nature, Human Nature, and God.

Spencer Burke – Former megachurch pastor, now Emerging Church leader. Creator of TheOOZE.com, an international online community for diverse Christians to connect through articles and social networking. Author of A Heretic’s Guide to Eternity.

Jim Burklo – Associate Dean of Religious Life at the University of Southern California; ordained in the United Church of Christ. A former pastor and leading voice in Progressive Christianity. Author of Open Christianity: Home by Another Road.

Philip Clayton – Philosopher and theologian at Claremont School of Theology, whose focus is the intersection of science and religion. Author of All That Is: A Naturalistic Faith for the Twenty-First Century.

John Cobb – Prominent United Methodist process theologian and long-time professor at Claremont School of Theology. Author of Process Theology and Christian Faith and Religious Diversity.

Ted Davis – Professor of the History of Science at Messiah College. Past President of the American Scientific Affiliation: a fellowship of men and women of science and related disciplines who share a common fidelity to the Bible and a commitment to integrity in the practice of science.

Michael Dowd – Itinerant evolutionary evangelist and evangelical naturalist. Author of Thank God for Evolution: How the Marriage of Science and Religion Will Transform Your Life and Our World, which was endorsed by 6 Nobel Prize-winning scientists and by religious leaders across the spectrum.

Matthew Fox – Founder of the Creation Spirituality movement. Formerly a Catholic priest, now Episcopal. Author of Original Blessing; The Coming of the Cosmic Christ; and Natural Grace.

Karl Giberson – Noted science and religion scholar who teaches at Eastern Nazarene College. Vice President of BioLogos Foundation, a think-tank helping evangelical Christians integrate faith with science. Author of Saving Darwin: How to Be a Christian and Believe in Evolution.

Owen Gingerich – Professor Emeritus of Astronomy and of the History of Science at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics. Author of God’s Universe and The Eye of Heaven: Ptolemy, Copernicus, Kepler.

John F. Haught – Leading Catholic evolutionary theologian and Senior Fellow in Science & Religion at Georgetown University. Author of Making Sense of Evolution and Christianity and Science: Toward a Theology of Nature.

Ross Hostetter – A leader in the emerging field of Integral Christianity. Co-founder of Boulder Integral Center.

Kevin Kelly – Co-founder and Senior Maverick of Wired magazine and former publisher and editor of The Whole Earth Review. Author of New Rules for the New Economy; Out of Control; and What Technology Wants.

Denis Lamoureux – A leading evangelical contributor to the public understanding of evolution. Council member of the Canadian Scientific and Christian Affiliation. Author of I love Jesus and I Accept Evolution.

Ian Lawton – A gifted preacher ordained as an Anglican priest in Australia. Now pastor of C3 Exchange, an inclusive spiritual community near Grand Rapids. Established Soulseeds.com to inspire and encourage people in all stages of life.

Brian McLaren – “Rock star” of the Emerging Church movement. Recognized in Time magazine as one of America’s 25 most influential evangelicals [is this what evangelicals have come to? – McLaren is about as liberal as they get]. Author of A Generous Orthodoxy; The Secret Message of Jesus; A New Kind of Christianity; and the forthcoming, Naked Spirituality.

Kenneth R Miller – Brown University cell biologist and leading advocate, nationally, of the public understanding of evolution. Author of Finding Darwin’s God: A Scientist’s Search for Common Ground Between God and Evolution.

Sally Morgenthaler – A prophetic voice within evangelical Christianity, calling the Church out of its inward-focus to become a transforming, generative presence in the world. Has served as adjunct professor at Yale University, Fuller Theological Seminary, Gordon Conwell Seminary, and others.

Michael Morwood – A respected voice in Progressive Christianity with 40 years experience in retreat, education, parish and youth ministries. Author of Tomorrow’s Catholic; Praying a New Story; and Children Praying a New Story: A Resource for Parents, Grandparents and Teachers.

Diarmuid O’Murchu – Catholic priest and social psychologist living in Dublin, Ireland, and a leading evolutionary theologian. Author of Quantum Theology; Evolutionary Faith; and Ancestral Grace.

Doug Pagitt – Emerging Church pastor and consultant for churches and denominations on issues of postmodern culture, social systems, and religious faith. Co-founder of Emergent Village and author of A Christianity Worth Believing. [He is also a universalist, and preaching pastor at Solomon’s Temple.]

William D. Phillips – Co-recipient of the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1997 for development of methods to cool and trap atoms with laser light. A United Methodist lay person and a founding member of the International Society for Science & Religion.

John Polkinghorne – Physicist and Fellow of the Royal Society, Britain’s most distinguished science society. Also an Anglican priest and theologian. Awarded the Templeton Prize in 2002. Author of The Faith of a Physicist and Belief in God in an Age of Science.

Richard Rohr – Catholic priest who founded the Center for Action and Contemplation. Contributing editor for Sojourners magazine and a contributor to Tikkun magazine. Author of The Naked Now: Learning to See as the Mystics See and Why Be Catholic?.

Bruce Sanguin – Pastor of Canadian Memorial United Church, in Vancouver, British Columbia, which is a congregation that, through his leadership, models open-hearted evolutionary Christian spirituality. Author of Darwin, Divinity, and the Dance of the Cosmos and If Darwin Prayed.

Mary Southard – Catholic nun and student of Thomas Berry, whose paintings, sculptures, and Earth Calendar communicate a sacred and deep-time relationship to Earth and Cosmos across religious divides.

John Shelby Spong – Retired Episcopal bishop and prophetic theologian whose books have sold more than a million copies, among them: Rescuing the Bible from Fundamentalism and Why Christianity Must Change or Die.

Charles H Townes – Awarded the Nobel Prize in physics in 1964 for his invention of the laser. Received the Templeton Prize in 2005 for contributions to the understanding of religion.

Tom Thresher – UCC pastor and Integral Christianity leader. Teaches leadership at Bainbridge Graduate Institute. Author of Reverent Irreverence: Integral Church for the 21st Century—From Cradle to Christ Consciousness.

Gail Worcelo – Catholic nun who co-founded Green Mountain Monastery with Thomas Berry. Working toward grounding religious life within the context of the Universe Story. A leader in the Sisters of Earth movement.

Regarding Brian Sanguin listed above, check out his church’s website. The church provides links to a series of sermons explaining and defending Evolutionary Christianity:

http://www.canadianmemorial.org/sermons_2/2009_05_10.html
http://www.canadianmemorial.org/sermons_2/2009_05_17.html
http://www.canadianmemorial.org/sermons_2/2009_05_24.html
http://www.canadianmemorial.org/sermons_2/2009_06_21.html

This website also includes an archive of “sermons” – check them out.  Brian Sanguin has preached about many aspects of the false teaching of Evolutionary Christianity.

http://www.canadianmemorial.org/sermons.html
http://www.canadianmemorial.org/original_site/archive.htm

And this “church’s” website homepage:

http://www.canadianmemorial.org/

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