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Posts Tagged ‘Malone University’

Update 11/07/12: Malone University still publicizes itself as a born again Christian school. Yet today I noticed Malone’s library has a display of 13 books by Emergent heretic Tony Campolo. Why? Read on.
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On 10/28/12 The Repository ran an article by Denise Sautters entitled “King era begins at Malone.” Towards the end of the article, I was struck by a comment from Dr. David King, being inaugurated 10/28/12 as Malone’s 13th president (1). (The latter part of this press release explains the presidential search process by Malone’s Board of Trustees; the press release does not mention how many of the Trustees were on the search committee.) Dr. King states:

“… [having time at a university before one’s inauguration] gives the president time to … develop a vision for the university.”

With all due respect, how biblically sound is Dr. King’s vision for Malone University? (2) Does it match the original vision of J. Walter Malone, the university’s founder? Based on his first year at Malone (prior to his inauguration), my impression is that Dr. King (along with a number of other presidents, faculty and staff) is taking Malone down a theological path far different from that envisioned by J. Walter Malone. I truly believe that J. Walter Malone’s dream for a born again, separatist Fundamentalist, Wesleyan Holiness, Evangelical Friends theological legacy is very close to being lost. (In addition, various heresies are entering the EFC-ER through routes other than Malone University.) How tragic!

Question: Emergent heretic Tony Campolo spoke at Malone University 09/28/12. Does this provide clues to new president Dr. King’s “vision for the university”? Read on…
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Tony Campolo Like many discerning Christians (especially “fundies”/fundamentalists), I was shocked and angered by Charita Goshay’s prominent article favoring Emergent heretic Tony Campolo in The Repository Saturday 09/29/12. Her article summarized Campolo’s speech to Malone University students 09/28/12. (Malone University is an Evangelical Friends/EFCI school; Tony Campolo taught at new Malone president David King’s former school – Eastern University.)

“Church articles” are usually hidden away on the inside pages of The Repository‘s Section B each Saturday, on the so called “Faith and Values” pages. Yet Ms. Goshay’s article was prominently displayed on the front page of Section B (along with a blurb on the newspaper’s front page pointing readers to the article about Campolo). Apparently Ms. Goshay (and/or The Repository) knows that Campolo is a popular speaker. I am very disappointed – and angry – that Goshay did not write a more objective article, pointing out Campolo’s heresies and including statements from opponents.

Another problem – for me Goshay’s article raises more questions than it answers. For starters:

1) Was this event publicized beforehand, or was it an “inside event” only publicized to Malone students and parents? If  Campolo’s speech was not publicized on a wider scale, why wasn’t it?

I did find this description of the event here, in the Schedule for Parents’ Weekend:

2-3 p.m. [Fri. 09/28/12] –  Tony Campolo Speaking, Johnson Center Sanctuary. Dr. Campolo is a speaker, author, sociologist, and pastor. Over his many years of Christian service, Tony has boldly challenged millions of people all over the world to respond to God’s boundless love by combining personal discipleship, evangelism, and social justice. He will speak and then take time for questions from our students.

Note Malone’s positive description of Campolo. They could have said something like “this controversial Emergent leader is coming to Malone to debate his liberal views with Malone’s Professor so-and-so” (ala Brian McLaren’s debate at Malone). Yet Malone did not say this with Campolo.

2) Goshay’s article consists almost entirely of “born again Christianese” quotes from Campolo. Yet Campolo is an extremely heretical Emergent, on par with Brian McLaren, Leonard Sweet, etc. Did Goshay leave out Campolo’s mainline/liberal/Emergent statements, or was Campolo’s entire speech “born again Christianese”?

4) Is Campolo’s entire speech (or a transcript of it) available online?

5) Did any Malone students protest Campolo’s coming to speak? (If so I’d like to meet them – we have a kindred spirit.)

6) In Campolo’s Q&A session, were opponents allowed to voice their  concerns about his heresies?

7) What individual(s) invited Campolo to come speak at Malone? Did the individual(s) not know that Campolo had a theological stance (heretical Emergent teachings) incompatible with what Malone has claimed to believe at least in the past? (For example, Campolo’s favoring the LGBT movement – an issue Malone has claimed it opposes.) Malone does seem to be changing in various ways – I’m not sure what specific individuals are pushing this change. (Check out their current Mission and Foundational Principles, for example.)

8) David King was recently hired as Malone University President. King was previously an employee of Eastern University, where the heretical Campolo taught for ten years. (In fact, the graduate department at Eastern University is named after Campolo.) Did King’s coming to Malone have anything to do with Campolo coming to speak?  Or was that just a coincidence? (And how about Betsy Morgan, professor emerita of English at EU, coming to speak at Dr. King’s Inaugural Symposium – was that also just a coincidence?)

Campolo Emergent and heretical

Just how Emergent/heretical is Tony Campolo? Here’s a clue: Campolo is an ordained minister in the mainline/liberal American Baptist Churches USA denomination. Note this description of the denomination, found here:

Generally considered more liberal than the Southern Baptist Convention, the American Baptist Churches in the U.S.A. is a member of the National Council of Churches of Christ in the U.S.A. and of the World Council of Churches. It has taken an active part in ecumenical affairs and has worked for closer union among the various Baptist groups.

In 1998 the denomination adopted an “American Baptist Identity Statement” that sought to summarize the Christian faith representative of American Baptists. This was amended in 2005 to include a statement about homosexuality…

“Fundies” have a right to be critical of Campolo. In his book Letters to a Young Evangelical (2006), Campolo devotes Chapter 9 to describing and criticizing Fundamentalists. The chapter is entitled “Being Rescued from Fundamentalism”; the entire chapter is viewable online. Malone University was strongly separatist fundamentalist Wesleyan Holiness between approx. 1892-1942. Any Malone alumnus who loves Evangelical Friends of this time period should be offended by Campolo’s criticisms of fundamentalism.

For those who are still not convinced that Campolo is extremely heretical, consider these quotes from Campolo (click here for another blog of mine dealing with Campolo and other Emergents):

“Going to heaven is like going to Philadelphia… There are many ways…It doesn’t make any difference how we go there. We all end up in the same place.” 1a

“On the other hand, we are hard-pressed to find any biblical basis for condemning deep love commitments between homosexual Christians as long as those commitments are not expressed in sexual intercourse.” 1b

“But the overwhelming population of the gay community that love Jesus, that go to church, that are deeply committed in spiritual things, try to change and can’t change…” 1c

“…we want to see God at work converting society, converting the systems, so that there aren’t the racist overtones, the economic injustices, the polluting of the atmosphere.” 1d

“I learn about Jesus from other religions. They speak to me about Christ, as well.”1e

“I’m not convinced that Jesus only lives in Christians.” 1f

1a CarpeDiem: Seize the Day, 1994 page 85;
1b “20 Hot Potatoes Christians Are Afraid To Touch” page 117;
1c Beliefnet.com/faith/Christianity 08/2004;
1d MSNBC 2008 interview;
1e MSNBC 2008 interview;
1f Charlie Rose show 1/24/97

(Tony Campolo is an author, professor of Sociology at Eastern College, former spiritual counselor to President Bill Clinton, and a leader of the movement called “Red Letter Christians”.)

Campolo’s lack of adherence to Eastern University’s Doctrinal Statement

(Click here for the Doctrinal Statement and ending Sections; to me the Doctrinal Statement sounds biblically sound for the most part – even if many Eastern University employees do not truly follow it)

Note the following two sections below. David King and Tony Campolo had to sign Eastern University’s Doctrinal Statement annually. I don’t know much about King, but it is obvious from Campolo’s writings that Campolo (like many employees of the liberal Eastern University I’m sure) does not hold the born again Christian beliefs stated in the Doctrinal Statement. Yet Campolo taught at Eastern University for ten years; they even honored him by naming their graduate college after him.

Apparently signing the Doctrinal Statement is like taking an oath in court (“I promise to tell the truth… so help me God”), or like making a wedding vow (“I promise to love you… till death do us part”). Signing Eastern University’s Doctrinal Statement annually seems to mean nothing to many employees there. I believe signing a Doctrinal Statement such as this, when you do not truly believe it, is a very serious offense against the Lord.

[In the excerpts below, I have emphasized certain points by bolding.]

SECTION II

Every member of the Board of Trustees, every administrative officer of the Institution, professor, teacher, and instructor shall annually subscribe over his or her signature to the Doctrinal Statement, excepting only that a non-Baptist individual occupying any of the foregoing positions shall not be required to subscribe to that part of the Doctrinal Statement regarding the mode of water baptism.

SECTION III

Whenever a member of the Board of Trustees, administrative officer, professor, teacher or instructor is not in complete accord with the foregoing Doctrinal Statement, he or she shall forthwith withdraw from all connections with the University, and his or her failure to do so shall constitute grounds for immediate removal from such positions by the Trustees.

ENDNOTES

(1) Malone’s 13 presidents are:
1) J. Walter Malone (1892-1918)
2) Edgar Wollam (1918-1921)
3) C.W. Butler (1921-1936)
4) Worthy A. Spring (1936-1948)
5) G. Arnold Hodgin (1948-1951)
6) Byron L. Osborne (1951-1960)
7) Everett L. Cattell (1960-1972)
8) Lon Randall (1972-1981)
9) Gordon R. Werkema (1981-1988)
10) Arthur Self (1988-____)
11) Ron Johnson (____-____)
12)  Gary W. Streit (_____-2010)
12a) Provost Will Friesen, Ph.D., Interim (2010-2012)
13) Dr. David King, (2012-     )

Sources: #1-7: Ohio Yearly Meeting Quaker Sesqui-centennial Commemorative publication, 1962, p.  43
#8,9: EFC-ER 175th Anniversary Commemorative publication, 1987, p. 32
#9:  Founded by Friends: The Quaker Heritage of Fifteen American Colleges and Universities, by John William Oliver, Charles L. Cherry, Caroline L. Cherry, 1970. p. 215 (viewable online)
#10,11: personal conversations with Malone associates
#12,12a: Malone University Welcomes 13th President: David King

(2) Another clue concerning Dr. King’s vision for Malone – and Malone’s vision for itself – is given here:

According to Board Chair Steven Steer, “Dr. King’s depth and breadth of experience seem to have converged with Malone’s vision for the future in a divine appointment.” King says it was Malone’s foundational principals that speak to the integration of faith, learning, and experiential activism that ultimately drew him to the University. Those words resonated within him, and it has not taken him long to embrace the University’s mission as his own.

Frankly, this sounds rather ambiguous to me. To get more specific, it seems to me Malone and Dr. King are pushing the envelope of contemplative spirituality (ala Richard Foster) and the Emerging/Emergent movement.

FOR FURTHER READING

I will be compiling a list of discernment articles about Tony Campolo’s heresies and providing the links here. For starters:

Apprising Ministries – various discernment blogs about Campolo

Let Us Reason Ministries – various articles about Campolo

Lighthouse Trails – article about Campolo

Manny Silva – various  discernment blogs about Campolo

A list of Google hits – articles about Campolo’s endorsement of occultish, contemplative centering prayer (click here for a discernment article exposing centering prayer)

Eastern University’s ringing endorsement of their Emergent darling Tony Campolo

2007: Mennonite Emergent Conversation (with representatives mostly from the liberal Mennonite Church USA denomination) held at Eastern University

2008: Campolo’s stint as featured speaker at 2008 Yearly Meeting of NWYM (the most liberal/Emergent Region of the Evangelical Friends denomination)

2012: Eastern University receives a grant to study occultish contemplative labyrinth prayer

The Repository‘s article mentions that Campolo has written 39 books. I am looking for a complete list of his writings (hopefully with content viewable online). (Admittedly, Campolo is a very readable writer; his books explain heretical Emergent teachings in laymen’s terms.)

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[blog under construction]

I would have to say, despite its problems, Malone University (MU) is still the most biblically sound educational institution in the EFCI.

Case in point: in 2009 MU had Brian McLaren as a guest speaker.  This was a “big deal”, a shocker to many in the community.

For an mp3 file of the debate:

1) Go to the following URL:
http://podcasts.malone.edu/wvf/worldviewforum.xml

2) Search for the following text, then download the mp3 file of the debate:
World View Forum: Emerging or Diverging:  In What Direction if The Emerging Church Movement Headed?Monday, March 30, 2009 7:00 PMProponents: Brian McLaren and Dr. Bryan Hollon; Moderator: Dr. Suzanne Nicholson

Warning: the following four blogs are pro-Emergent and pro-McLaren. Nonetheless, this blogger did a thorough job of discussing the McLaren-Hollon debate:

Bob Robinson’s 03/31/09 blog –  The Inquisition of Brian McLaren?
Bob Robinson’s 04/01/09 blog – Brian McLaren: Six Stages of the Emerging Church Conversation
Bob Robinson’s 04/02/09 blog – Cage Match: Bryan Hollon vs. Brian McLaren (Well, Not Exactly)
Bob Robinson’s 04/03/09 blog – McLaren at Malone: My Musings on the Mêlée

More articles about the Malone debate (some are for McLaren, some are not):

1) http://www.thoughts.com/pastornar/my-thoughts-on-brian-mclaren-emerging-church-debat

2) http://joeldaniel.wordpress.com/2009/04/03/world-view-forum-reflections/

3) http://philosophyovercoffee.blogspot.com/2009/03/evening-with-brian-mclaren.html

 

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In 1965, various “conservative evangelical” Yearly Meetings of Friends (Gurneyite Quakers) united to form the Evangelical Friends Alliance (EFA). Eventually the  EFA became the Evangelical Friends Church International (EFCI).

Northwest Yearly Meeting (NWYM) of the EFCI is home to George Fox University (GFU) and George Fox Evangelical Seminary (GFES). My question is, when and how did NYWM, GFU and GFES become so liberal? In other words, when and how did they go from “conservative evangelical” to “progressive evangelical”? The change is shocking. [I am using the terms “liberal” and “progressive evangelical” interchangeably.]

Malone University (MU), another school in the EFCI, in 2009 had Brian McLaren as a guest speaker, and this was a “big deal”, a shocker to many in the community. Why is it that GFU and GFES are so much more “progressive evangelical” than MU?

We do know that the Spiritual Formation movement took off among evangelicals in 1978, with the publication of Richard Foster’s book Celebration of Discipline (Foster has had many ties with the EFCI over the years).  It should come as no surprise that Foster pastored in the liberal NWYM, as well as taught at the liberal George Fox College/University.

The Emerging/Emergent Church movements started becoming popular around 1995. I would guess that GFU and GFES heartily endorsed and promulgated these movements as soon as they began.

Note – all Regions of the EFC-NA (which falls under the umbrella of the EFCI) are becoming progressive evangelical to some degree. Currently I would say NWYM is the most progressive. And I would say EFC-ER (which hosts Malone University) is the least progressive.

Back to the point. Following is a recent GFES web page listing various seminars. Notice the lengthy list of Emerging/Emergent speakers for past seminars:

Ministry in Contemporary Culture Series

A New Creation! - The Fusion of Ministry and Creative Arts

A one-day seminar with Dan Kimball and Maggi Dawn

Wednesday, February 9, 2011  |  9 a.m. to noon
George Fox Evangelical Seminary

Maggi Dawn and Dan Kimball

Join us as we explore the multifaceted ways in which art forms function as “theological media,” conveying spiritual realities in ways that words cannot. You will learn some of the principal ways that faithful Christ followers used these media throughout the ages … and discover fresh ways to use these media today!

Schedule

9 a.m.    Maggi’s session: The Intersection of Theology & the Arts in Historical Perspective
10:05 a.m.    Break
10:15 a.m.    Dan’s session: The Intersection of Theology& the Arts in Contemporary Ministry
11:20 a.m.    Break
11:30 a.m.    Pastor’s panel response

Bios

Dan Kimball is the author of several books on church leadership and culture. He is on staff at Vintage Faith Church in Santa Cruz, Calif., and on faculty at George Fox University. He enjoys comic art, Ford Mustangs and punk and rockabilly music. His passion is to see the church and Christians follow and represent Jesus with love, intelligence and creativity. His website and blog is at dankimball.com

Maggi Dawn is an author and theologian. She began her professional life as a singer-songwriter, but later after reading for a degree and a PhD in theology turned her creative talents to writing books. Maggi is currently based at the University of Cambridge (UK), where she is chaplain and Fellow in Theology at Robinson College, and is available for writing and consulting projects.

Her book, The Writing on the Wall (Hodder and Stoughton, 2010), explores some of the most influential stories and ideas from the Bible, and shows how they have been woven into Western culture. If you love art, music and literature, and want to understand the hidden layers of meaning that derive from the Bible, this book is essential reading.

Past Seminars

Margaret Feinberg, Understanding Megatrends: The Church’s Missional Witness in a Millenial Age
Dallas Willard,
Knowing Christ: The Hope of Moral Knowledge
Leonard Sweet, The Influence of Islam on the 21st Century Church
Dan Kimball, They like Jesus, but not the church; author of The Emerging Church, Emerging Worship and They Like Jesus, But Not the Church. He is pastor of Vintage Faith Church in Santa Cruz, Calif., a newly planted missional church.
Joseph Myers, Organic community: the chemistry of belonging
Leighton Ford, From Crusade to Coffee House
Marva Dawn, Unfettered Hope, A call to Faithful Living in an Affluent Society
Tom and Christine Sine, Searching for Sanity in America’s Culture Wars
Lena-Sofia Tiemeyer, The Christian Community in Israel and Their Role in Reconciliation
Brian McLaren, Beyond Pluralism: Living Faithfully in a Polarized World of Fundamentalism and Relativism
Tony Campolo, Being Compassionate and Prophetic in Ministry
Stephen Delamarter, Technology in Ministry
Leonard Sweet, Leadership and Evangelism in the Emerging Culture
Paul Lessard, Authentic Worship
Len Sweet, Dan Kimball, MaryKate Morse, Alan Hirsch, & Frank Viola, Recalibrating Concepts of Church
Richard Twiss, Robert Francis, Terry LeBlanc, and Randy Woodley, An American Theology of the Land
Joseph Myers, Technomadic: Mapping Our Way in an Unbounded World
Scot McKnight, In the Beginning was the Gospel

See also this more recent link:

http://www.georgefox.edu/seminary/news-events/ministry-contemporary-culture.html

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(revised 11/12/13)

I was seriously considering revising this blog, so it would not be as hurtful to my many friends in the EFCI. However, I have decided against toning down the blog; I want to show the exact wording to which a high official in the EFCI responded. (See his comments and my responses at the bottom of this blog.) Note – since then I have added additional statements to my original blog.

Click here for a detailed critique of the EFC-ER and EFCI. And click here for a detailed history of the EFC-ER.
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J. Walter Malone [click here for  a brief bio] was the founder of Cleveland Bible Institute, which today is Malone University. Yet today Malone University is being drawn down the same slippery path as many other colleges, seminaries and churches in the EFCI (Evangelical Friends Church International) denomination. All these institutions are being drawn deeper into Spiritual Formation, the Emerging/Emergent/Emergence movements, and ecumenical Quakerism, and other heretical, liberal teachings. Surely J. Walter Malone and other like minded Ohio Evangelical Friends of his era would “roll over in their graves.”  (By the way, J. Walter Malone was a contemporary of one of my favorite born again, biblically sound Ohio Evangelical Friends – Edward Mott –  whom I have written about in other blogs.)

Consider these excerpts from the book entitled The Quakers in America, by Thomas D. Hamm (pp. 58-59):

Not all Gurneyite Friends approved of [liberal Quaker Rufus] Jones or his vision. By 1900, many of the surviving leaders of the Great Revival… were strong critics. They perceived Jones and his sympathizers as unenthusiastic about revivalism and prone to overintellectualizing religion… The most important opponent of Jones, however, was of his generation: J. Walter Malone.

Malone was born into an old Quaker family in southwestern Ohio in 1857 and moved to Cleveland as a young man, where he achieved considerable success in business. He and his wife Emma had become converts to holiness Quakerism, and in 1892 decided to use their wealth to found [Cleveland Bible College], a Bible college or “training school for Christian workers,” as they called it, which eventually became the Friends Bible Institute… The Malones and all of the teachers at Cleveland were deeply suspicious of Quaker modernism. [I wonder if this “deep suspicion” applied to all teachers through the time of the school’s relocation/renaming in 1957.] By questioning the inerrancy of Scripture,[Quaker modernism] threatened the authority of the Bible. By emphasizing the Inner Light, it seemed to minimize the need for definite experiences of conversion and sanctification. By stressing social service and reform, it seemed to suggest that humans could save the world, rather than looking to the Second Coming of Christ. And by dwelling on the mercy and love of God, it seemed to ignore His judgment [emphasis mine; notice how similar the modernist Quaker teachings are to the Emergent Church teachings of today]. In 1902, Malone began publishing a journal, the Soul Winner, to advance his views. In 1905 he changed its name to the Evangelical Friend, which became increasingly outspoken in its attacks on Jones and other modernist Quakers.

Malone and his coadjutors were consciously part of the larger movement in American Protestantism that [in later years] would become known as fundamentalism.

For the next two decades, modernists and holiness Friends struggled for the control of the Five Years Meeting and its yearly meetings. The battle had at least three fronts. One was the personnel of the Five Years Meeting – its central office staff and its missionaries. Central to this struggle was the American Friend, the official organ [edited by Rufus Jones until 1912, then edited by like minded liberal Quakers]. The second front was the Quaker colleges. [Sound familiar? Colleges and seminaries today are one of the main venues in which Spiritual Formation and the Emerging/Emergent Church movements are brainwashing today’s Evangelical Friends youth.] Holiness Friends did their best to exclude modernist teachings from schools like Earlham in Indiana, Whittier in California, Pacific in Oregon, Friends in Kansas, and Penn in Iowa. The results were uneven… [Several following pages are unavailable online – I am hoping to locate this book in a Quaker archive.]

Source:

http://books.google.com/books?id=2mvHwSAP5vYC&pg=PA60&dq=%22cleveland+bible+college%22&hl=en&ei=uuGoTeHJB6rg0gHGxLX6CA&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=9&ved=0CHMQ6AEwCA#v=onepage&q=holiness&f=false

I find it disconcerting that one of J. Walter Malone’s own family seems to have attempted revising history, to paint a different picture of what J. Walter Malone was all about. Specifically Malone’s son-in-law, Dr. Byron L. Osborne (The Malone Story, 1970 edition, p. 223). In years past I have personally had deep respect and admiration for Dr. Osborne, who for a time was  President of Malone College/University). I have recently learned that, apparently, Dr. Osborne revised J. Walter Malone’s story to be a feel-good, non-offensive history (non-offensive to non-evangelical Quakers, that is).

Over the years, assorted Ohio Evangelical Friends have tended to leave out or reinterpret the parts of history in which fundamentalist Gurneyite Quakers battled modernists, including non-evangelical Quakers. They have portrayed all Quakers as “equally Christian” in God’s eyes, whether they were evangelical or non-evangelical. Dr. Osborne seems to have followed this trend. His repainting of his own father-in-law J. Walter Malone seems to have contributed to a conciliatory effort to unite with non-evangelical Quakers in Quaker ecumenism. He has downplayed and/or denied the argumentative, anti-modernist side of J. Walter Malone. In The Malone Story (1970 edition, pp. 21-24), Dr. Osborne presents  a few short quotes trying to prove that J. Walter Malone “was not a controversialist.” He includes a quote from liberal “social gospel” Quaker Rufus Jones implying Jones and J. Walter Malone were on good speaking terms. Yet Dr. Osborne fails to mention the reams of articles in J. Walter Malone’s The Soulwinner and The Evangelical Friend [both periodicals are housed in the Malone University Friends Archives] in which Malone passionately and incessantly condemned non-evangelical Quakers including Rufus Jones.

To summarize, it seems that various Ohio Evangelical Friends have been complicit in reinterpreting or even denying the “negative” anti-modernist side of J. Walter Malone and of Gurneyite Quaker history. For this and other reasons (such as Spiritual Formation and Emerging/Emergent teachings – see below) I personally feel deeply betrayed by these complicit Evangelical Friends whom I once trusted and admired as my denominational leaders.

How pathetic and ironic, that non-evangelical writers have provided detailed  information about the history of fundamentalist/anti-modernist Gurneyite Quakers, whereas Ohio Evangelical Friends/Gurneyite Quaker writers themselves have provided us very scant info and/or revisionist Quaker histories.

To put this in context, this “revision” of the fundamentalist, “controversialist” side of J. Walter Malone was typical of actions being taken in many other evangelical denominations in the twentieth century.

I would say evangelicals between 1900-1970 including the Ohio Evangelical Friends – represented by Dr. Byron Osborne and Dr. Everett L. Cattell among others – went through several steps toward apostasy:

1948 – The Ohio Evangelical Friends took a big step towards losing the fundamentalist-modernist battle when the National Association of Evangelicals was formed. (Although the Evangelical Friends did not join the NAE, they were affected by their teachings.)

1957 – The Ohio Evangelical Friends lost further ground in 1957, with the beginning of the Billy Graham Crusades.

1965 – Another tragic step toward apostasy occurred in 1965, when Ohio Yearly Meeting (Gurneyite) joined with more liberal Yearly Meetings to form what is today the Evangelical Friends Church International (EFCI) denomination.

1970 – The last nail in the coffin was the St. Louis Conference, in which Dr. Cattell insisted on the forming of an ecumenical alliance with non-evangelical Quakers (in spite of opposition from some Ohio Evangelical Friends who were present).

To backtrack a bit: I have had great respect and admiration for Dr. Cattell in years past. It was only recently that I learned Dr. Cattell had been hoping for Quaker ecumenism very early in his life – and strove throughout his life to make this dream come true. I have no doubt that Dr. Cattell and the other Ohio Evangelical Friends/Gurneyite Quakers mentioned here thought highly of the teachings of New Evangelicalism. As with Dr. Osborne, I have felt a deep sense of betrayal and of being deceived upon learning these things about Dr. Cattell.

Fast forward to today’s apostate situation. The Evangelical Friends denomination (EFCI), like many other evangelical denominations, is far different from the denomination of 100 years ago. The gospel message preached by fundamentalist Gurneyite “holiness Friends” such as J. Walter Malone seems to have been lost in the modern apostate sea of Spiritual Formation and the Emerging/Emergent Church movements. The EFCI appears to be condoning (or at least accommodating) not only the false teachings of other Quaker denominations. The EFCI also appears to be condoning the liberal leanings of all of its Regions.  (The Regions outside of the EFC-ER have always tended to be more liberal/ progressive than the EFC-ER (Evangelical Friends Church-Eastern Region, formerly called Ohio Yearly Meeting).

How tragic! I’m sure there are many attenders of Evangelical Friends churches that are concerned about this. But, unlike the fundamentalist-modernist controversy of J. Walter Malone’s day, there are few if any modern Evangelical Friends leaders that have stood up and loudly protested. Referring to the lack of concerned and discerning church leaders throughout evangelicalism today, it has been said:

“Where are the watchmen on the wall?”  (source unknown)

Just a note regarding Cleveland Bible College, and its replacement Malone College/Malone University. How ironic that J. Walter Malone and Dr. Everett Cattell were on opposite sides of the ecumenical Quakerism fence.  J. Walter Malone strongly opposed ecumenical Quaker efforts, while Dr. Cattell pushed strongly for ecumenical Quakerism. The irony lies in the fact that J. Walter Malone founded  Cleveland Bible College, which was relocated and renamed as Malone College in 1957 (and now is named Malone University); Dr. Cattell later became President of Malone College/University.

One final question to those who think I’m being a troublemaker, too critical of the EFCI leadership. If J. Walter Malone were alive today, do you think he would be protesting Spiritual Formation and Emerging/Emergent Church teachings in the EFCI? Of course he would!

For further reading and research, go to the following URL:

http://www.google.com/search?q=%5B%22Walter+Malone%22+%22Quaker%22%5D&btnG=Search+Books&tbm=bks&tbo=1

You should see about 290 results. Click on “Preview available” on the left, and you should see about 75 results – resources readable online. Many of these online resources show bibliographies listing further resources.

Also, there are various Quaker libraries with archives. I hope to provide a list of these archives elsewhere (along with their websites), perhaps in a separate blog.

FOR FURTHER RESEARCH

J. Walter Malone Collection

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