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Posts Tagged ‘Nazarene’

(revised 02/04/14)

In this blog I wrote about how Emerging/Emergent heretic Tony Campolo spoke at EFCI’s Malone University 09/28/12. I am shocked by Malone University’s affinity (and the EFCI’s affinity) in recent years for heretics such as Campolo.

I have also been trying to keep up with goings-on in the Nazarene denomination and other Wesleyan Holiness denominations. Following is a blog originally posted here by my friend Manny Silva (reformednazarene), regarding Campolo’s visit to Southern Nazarene University. This blog is excellent, in that Manny provides a summary of Campolo’s heresies. He also provides a list of additional links about Campolo, following the blog.

False Teacher Campolo To Speak At Southern Nazarene University

Posted on November 15, 2012 by reformednazarene

The Nazarene denomination’s fascination with Tony Campolo, especially as a guest speaker at the universities, is astounding.  The latest venue he is scheduled at in the near future is Southern Nazarene University, where he is slated to speak on Feb. 14, 2013.  I am sending this to the president of Southern Nazarene University, and I hope that he will agree with those of us who are fully aware of the falsehoods in Tony Campolo’s ideology, which do not lineup at all with Nazarene teaching, and more importantly, with Biblical teaching and doctrine.  The right thing to do would then be to withdraw the invitation for Campolo, with the exception that they would at least provide a forum where he can be debated in front of the university students. I know several Nazarenes (myself included) who would, in a heartbeat, be willing to debate Dr. Campolo on the merits of his belief system, which I will highlight in a moment.  After all, is not the university the best place for a vigorous debate between opposing principles, where students can listen and make up their minds?  It would serve everyone well to see if Dr. Campolo’s beliefs stand up to the light of Scripture.

In previous posts, I have documented his promotion of pagan Celtic “Christianity” and its “thin places”.  In his speaking engagement at Eastern Nazarene College, he blatantly promoted “thin places” and contemplative spirituality, with Nazarene pastors in attendance at the chapel service, and not a word of protest as far as I know.  And I’m not surprised, as not one pastor in my New England area who happens to be on my email list has ever commented back to me about any concern about Tony Campolo.  One would think that they would want to correct any erroneous assessments of Tony Campolo, including the fact I have called him out as a false teacher.  I have not heard a word either supporting Tony Campolo, or condemning his false teachings.

I have had one university leader, Dr. Karl Leth of Olivet Nazarene University, respond to me and try to defend the welcoming of Dr. Campolo to their campus.  His defense failed the biblical test, although I do respect the fact that he was willing to try.

It truly is sad how bad things are getting in all our Nazarene universities.  It truly is sad how are General Superintendents have done nothing in the last four years since they started getting warnings from me and many others.  If they have been doing something to stop the onslaught of false teachings, I would love to know what it is.  And it certainly has not been made know publicly, which would be the proper thing to do, so there will know where they stand.  But no, continued silence from these leaders, who according to the church manual, are charged with the responsibility of interpreting church doctrine.

Below are just some examples of the heretical views of Tony Campolo.  Judge for yourself.  I am sending this to the General Superintendents again for their review and comment as to whether Tony Campolo reflects the values of the Church of the Nazarene.  It must be pointed out again that Dr. Campolo is never openly challenged in front of the students, who sit passively as he indoctrinates many of them with his false teachings.

SOME OF TONY CAMPOLO’S HERETICAL BELIEFS:

His ecumenicalism, and belief that you don’t even have to know you are saved, or astoundingly, that you even have to be a Christian to have “Jesus in you”.  He also places Islam on the same equal footing as Christianity.

“I’m not convinced that Jesus only lives in Christians.”  (Charlie Rose show on January 24, 1997)

“Beyond these models of reconciliation, a theology of mysticism provides some hope for common ground between Christianity and Islam. Both religions have within their histories examples of ecstatic union with God, which seem at odds with their own spiritual traditions but have much in common with each other.”  (Page 149, Speaking My Mind)

“I am saying that there is no salvation apart from Jesus; that’s my evangelical mindset. However, I am not convinced that Jesus only lives in Christians”  (National Liberty Journal, 8/99)

“…what can I say to an Islamic brother who has fed the hungry, and clothed the naked? You say, “But he hasn’t a personal relationship with Christ.” I would argue with that. And I would say from a Christian perspective, in as much as you did it to the least of these you did it unto Christ. You did have a personal relationship with Christ, you just didn’t know it.” (EVANGELICALS AND INTERFAITH COOPERATION, An Interview by Shane Claiborne)

“Jesus is the only Savior, but not everybody who is being saved by Him is aware that He is the one who is doing the saving”  (EP News Service, Oct. 4, 1985)

“What I am trying to say is that Jesus who incarnated God 2,000 years ago is mystically present and waiting to be discovered in EVERY person you and I encounter”  (A Reasonable Faith” 1983 page 171)

His Promotion of Contemplative Prayer (Mysticism)

His fascination with mysticism and heretics such as Ignatius of Loyola, who was a leader in the Counter-Reformation.  Here, he mentions Loyola as an important source of help for him.  Campolo apparently forgets the fact that Ignatius was in charge of the brutal group called the Jesuits, also known as the pope’s shock troops, who persecuted Christians who dared to defy the Roman Catholic teachings.  Yet, he calls Ignatius a saint!

“Counter-Reformation saints like Ignatius of Loyola have become important sources of help as I have begun to learn from them modes of contemplative prayer. I practice what is known as “centering prayer,” in which a sacred word is repeated as a way to be in God’s presence.”   (“Mystical Encounters for Christians”)

His Promotion of Mindless Repetitive Prayer and Pagan Celtic Spirituality

“I’ve got to push everything out of mind save the name of Jesus. I say His name over and over again, for as long as fifteen minutes, until I find my soul suspended in what the ancient Celtic Christians called a “thin place”–a state where the boundary between heaven and earth, divine and human, dissolves. You could say that I use the name of Jesus as my koan.”  (Mystical Encounters for Christians)

* It is also interesting that Nazarene Theological Seminary’s Doug Hardy is teaching the pagan Celtic Spirituality to future Nazarene pastors.  This is an abomination, frankly, along with the emergent ideology and other contemplative spirituality they are teaching.  The seminary is preparing our future false pastors for Nazarene churches across the globe right now.

His “Feminization” Of Jesus In the Following Statement

“There is a feminine side of God. I always knew this … It is this feminine side of God I find in Jesus that makes me want to sing duets with Him … Not only do I love the feminine is Jesus, but the more I know Jesus, the more I realize that Jesus loves the feminine in me. Until I accept the feminine in my humanness, there will be a part of me that cannot receive the Lord’s love. … There is that feminine side of me that must be recovered and strengthened if I am to be like Christ … And until I feel the feminine in Jesus, there is a part of Him which I cannot identify.”(Carpe Diem: Seize the Day”, 1994, pages 85-88)

His Lack of Understanding Of Scripture regarding Homosexuality

“On the other hand, we are hard-pressed to find any biblical basis for condemning deep love commitments between homosexual Christians, as long as those commitments are not expressed in sexual intercourse.”  (20 Hot Potatoes Christians Are Afraid To Touch”, page 117)

Dr. Campolo also believes in evolution; does not believe that the Bible is inerrantly inspired; believes that man has an inner divinity; believes non-Christians might go to heaven; believes that homosexuals are “born that way”, and that it is not a “volitional” issue.

So this man continues to get invited to our Christian schools to indoctrinate our students with all sorts of heresies.  Discernment was thrown out a long time ago by our leaders.

Related Articles:

Beware Tony Campolo:  http://www.wayoflife.org/database/campolo.html

http://reformednazarene.wordpress.com/2011/09/08/olivet-nazarene-lets-false-teacher-campolo-speak-in-chapel/

http://reformednazarene.wordpress.com/2011/02/01/symptoms-of-a-great-apostasy-in-our-christian-schools-and-seminaries/

http://reformednazarene.wordpress.com/2010/11/03/tony-campolos-thin-places-occultic-christianity/

http://reformednazarene.wordpress.com/2010/10/31/false-prophet-tony-campolo-promotes-doctrines-of-demons-to-enc-students/

http://reformednazarene.wordpress.com/2010/10/21/profiles-in-apostasy-tony-campolo/

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Schools in the Evangelical Friends denomination (EFCI) as well as the Nazarene denomination (aka Church of the Nazarene or CotN) are hotbeds of  contemplative and Emerging/Emergent teachings. I have been looking for ties between Emerging/Emergent Evangelical Friends schools and Emerging/Emergent Nazarene schools. The following press release provides the strongest evidence I have found so far.

Below I have reposted this press release which appeared in 2008. As of November 2012, Patrick Allen is still provost of George Fox University. In my repost I have emphasized certain points by bolding, and inserted comments in [brackets].

Bruin Notes
George Fox Journal, Spring 2008

“Allen fills top academic post”

Patrick Allen   Upon learning George Fox had an open provost position, Patrick Allen knew he had found his dream job.

“I saw the announcement in the Chronicle of Higher Education, cut it out, took it to my wife, Lori, and said, ‘Now this is the kind of place I’ve been talking about,’” he says. [Allen’s attraction to a contemplative/Emerging/Emergent hotbed speaks volumes.]

Allen, a chief academic officer at three universities over the past two decades [Southern Nazarene University, Point Loma Nazarene University, then GFU]  had reason to apply. “In several institutions where I led strategic planning efforts, George Fox was listed as a peer or aspiration institution — the kind of institution we desired to be like if we could,” he says. [Again GFU – a contemplative/Emerging/Emergent hotbed – is looked up to.]

The 57-year-old Allen was hired in December, culminating a search that began when Robin Baker [a contemplative/Emerging/Emergent I’m sure] vacated the provost position to become president in July 2007. The provost is the chief academic officer of the institution and is responsible for all academic staff and resources. [So Allen is directly aware of his contemplative/Emerging/Emergent faculty/staff and their teachings.]

Allen had been provost at Southern Nazarene University in Oklahoma since 2005, and before that served 10 years as provost and chief academic officer at 4,000-student Point Loma Nazarene University in San Diego. Other universities at which he has served include Anderson University, Friends University [Richard Foster taught at Friends University after a stint at GFU], and MidAmerica Nazarene University.

He earned a doctorate in higher education from the University of Oklahoma, and also holds master’s degrees in management (Southern Nazarene University) and liberal arts (Southern Methodist University). He earned a bachelor’s degree in psychology from Olivet Nazarene University.

“I feel that the provost has the second best job on campus and the president has the third best job — the best job is teaching and shaping students,” he says. “I get my kicks when I can recruit, equip, develop, encourage, challenge, and support the true heroes of the institution.” [Allen is referring to the faculty – who are contemplative/Emerging/Emergent.  See also this article describing the duties of a provost.]

Allen has taken more than 25 student groups to Europe; has played guitar in a bluegrass band in San Diego; and speaks in churches, conferences, and retreats on the value of community and Christian higher education.

Allen will begin July 1.

FOR FURTHER READING

http://www.georgefox.edu/offices/academic_affairs/index.html

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The following paragraph seems to have been removed from the Wikipedia article on “Church of the Nazarene“. At this web page, I found this note (which references the user who deleted the Concerned Nazarenes paragraph):

This is the current revision of this page, as edited by NazareneBishop (talk | contribs) at 22:17, 18 September 2012. The present address (URL) is a permanent link to this version.

A pretty bold move by NazareneBishop (whoever he is), removing the paragraph. In one fell swoop he changed the Wiki article from balanced (both sides) to biased (one sided).

Following is the deleted info, which I found by clicking on “previous revision” at the above Wikipedia link and ending up here. I suppose the info could be added back in, or liberal/Emerging/Emergent content could be removed that was just added. (Hint, hint!) In either case, again, NazareneBishop overstepped his bounds in messing with the previously two-sided article.

Concerned Nazarenes criticism

Alarmed by what they perceived to be the increasing influence of “emerging church philosophy that had crept into the Nazarene denomination”, after August 2008 a group of church members formed an organization called “Concerned Nazarenes”.[92] They believe that “The emergent ideology is a perversion of the Word of God and the doctrine of the Church of the Nazarene.”[93] The group circulated a petition to members of the denomination, which was presented by 500 members to the Board of General Superintendents in January 2009, with the desire that “Our fervent hope and prayer is that the General Superintendents will respond by purging our denomination of the emergent cancer before it is too late.”[93][94] Prior to the most recent General Assembly held in July 2009, the Concerned Nazarenes advocated revising the Articles of Faith to affirm biblical inerrancy: “Old and New Testaments are inerrant throughout and the supreme authority on everything the scriptures teach.”[93] Further, they are concerned about the teaching of open theism and biological evolution in Nazarene universities; invitations to emergent church leaders Brian McLaren, Leonard Sweet, and Doug Pagitt to speak at Nazarene institutions; and the use of “experiential works-based techniques for prayer”, including prayer labyrinths, prayer stations and retreats to Roman Catholic monasteries. On 15 June 2009 the Concerned Nazarenes issued a press release indicating “Conservatives are pushing the church hierarchy to make a clear statement about Scriptural inerrancy at the Orlando gathering. Representatives from Indiana have put forward a resolution, urging delegates to affirm the Bible as totally free of error.”[95] The resolution was defeated by a large majority of delegates voting. During the General Assembly 6,000 copies of a two-hour DVD outlining the perceived dangers of the Emergent Church were distributed to delegates and visitors.[96]

[92] ^ “Who Are Concerned Nazarenes?”, Concerned Nazarenes

[93] http://www.concernednazarenes.org/page12.php[dead link]

[94] ^ To see the petition, http://www.ericbarger.com/grace.naz.petition12-2008.pdf

[95] ^ http://www.ericbarger.com/naz.pressrelease.6-2009.pdf

[96] ^ Manny Silva, “General Assembly Diary” (Friday, July 3, 2009), http://reformednazarene.wordpress.com/general-assembly-diary/

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I came across this excellent “open letter” from Manny Silva to the Nazarene denomination, asking for an explanation of its accommodation of various heresies. Such heresies are being promulgated in virtually every evangelical denomination today – shocking!

I have copied the entire open letter verbatim. Click here for the original text of this open letter. Many of the statement have already been bolded by Manny. I have emphasized additional points by bolding, and inserted comments in [brackets]:

Open Letter #2 To The General Superintendents

Posted on April 11, 2011 by reformednazarene

This is my second open letter that I am writing to you, and my third letter overall.  I pray all is well with you.

I am writing this in a spirit of great concern and love for our fellow brothers and sisters in Christ.  I believe, with all humility, that I speak on behalf of a good number of Nazarenes as well.

The Church of the Nazarene manual states that your duties include:

317.1.1  “To provide supervision of the international Church of the Nazarene. The Board of General Superintendents shall provide appropriate attention to leadership, guidance, motivation…”

318. “The Board of General Superintendents shall be the authority for the interpretation of the law and doctrine of the Church of the Nazarene…”

Many are still seeking guidance and clear answers in these very troubling times within the church.  The influence of the emerging church movement is growing, and is causing an ever widening theological rift, as many Nazarenes see it as an apostate movement.  It has torn apart fellowship and brought chaos to many church families, including mine. It has resulted in the departure from the Nazarene denomination by many who have been watching a holiness church turn to teachings and traditions that years ago would have been unthinkable; teachings and practices that were rejected by the very people who started the Reformation.  We are reverting back to pre-Reformation behavior, and incorporating teachings and practices that were rejected by Martin Luther, and those who gave their very lives in defense of the true gospel.  We have lost more than 10,000 Nazarenes in the last four years in the U.S. and Canada.  Although I cannot tell you how much of that is due to emergent ideology or the embrace of Romanism and mysticism, I do have personal stories from dozens of people who have related to me that these movements have been the cause of their departure, or the cause of their current state of distress in their own church.

There are many things going on that are dividing our denomination and creating chaos among the believers, who are either unsure or afraid of the direction we are headed.  Many have become anxious because our leaders have not provided them with clear and unambiguous explanations of various concerns.  We believe that the main problem that is unfolding is a great separation between Bible believing Christians, and those who do not believe in the full authority and inerrancy of God’s word. If this continues, there will be many more permanently separating from the church, who will not abide with a continuing further erosion in trusting all of the Bible’s teachings.

I would like to submit just a few questions to you and ask for some absolute clarity as to what you as a governing board believe about the following issues, because unless we get complete clarity on where our leaders stand, the bleeding will continue anyway, and you will see more and more Nazarenes leaving.  Sure, some will leave no matter how you answer, but at least you will fulfill the mandate that the church manual has given to you, to be the authority for the interpretation of the law and doctrine of the Church of the Nazarene. Here are my questions:

  1. Celtic Spirituality class taught at Nazarene Theological Seminary
    For the life of me, I cannot understand why this course is being taught at a Christian seminary!If you have no information on this subject, I wrote a post.  Is this teaching appropriate and within the bounds of Christian orthodoxy?  If yes, please explain it, because this is occultism being taught here, and we are very concerned with this kind of teaching to those who are going to be our future pastors.  I have attached a syllabus from the class, and it is not just a study of the topic- it is for future pastors to fully participatein this pagan discipline.
  2. The teaching of Open Theism and Process Theology at our Christian colleges.
    Is it scripturally sound to teach that God does not know the future?  Is it within the bounds of orthodox Christianity and Nazarene doctrine to teach that God makes mistakes and learns from them?  Is this the new Nazarene teaching about the nature of God?
  3. Is the use of pagan prayer labyrinths, the placing of ashes to the forehead and other Roman Catholic rituals in Nazarene churches now acceptable and within the bounds of orthodox Christianity and Nazarene doctrine, in your opinion?
  4. Finally, what do each of you believe regarding the inerrancy of scripture? With all the troubles within the Nazarene denomination, I believe it can be traced to the lessening of the authority and infallibility of God’s word.  My question is simple and straight for each of you: do you believe that the Bible- all of it- is fully inspired by God, and IS actually God’s word? Furthermore, do you agree or disagree with those who are promoting the teaching that the first 11 chapters of Genesis are not necessarily true, and that much of the Bible is not necessarily true?  Do you believe Christians can actually reject the literal account of creation, and accept the idea that man evolved, including Adam and Eve?
    If so, what is the biblical justification to arrive at these conclusions, and how can we trust the Bible if parts of it are not true?  Does that not make God a liar?  This is the most important area I wish to get clarification on, and I pray that you will take the time to write a clear response, not just for me, but for many Nazarenes who are wondering about this.

That last question, by the way, is important for many reasons.  One was the astounding fact that a licensed minister in the New England District was told last year that he would probably not be approved for ordination.  For what reason, you may ask?  Was it for incompetence?  Did they tell him he just did not seem to have a genuine calling from God?  Did he have some kind of serious moral failure that discredited him?

No, it was none of that.  They simply told him that his view on the Bible- that it is the inspired and inerrant word of God- was not acceptable.  To his credit and courage, he has told the licensing board that he would not seek renewal of a District license, because of the lack of confidence within the denomination in the very word of God.  How shameful is it that this kind of thing can happen?  How many more young pastors will be rejected unless they fit into the mold that is being formed, a mold that apparently rejects scripture as fully divinely inspired.  Instead, pastors are being ordained if they believe in open theism, process theology, or that we came from apes.  Does that sound like the Christian world turned upside down to you?  And let me remind you of the pastors who have been faithful to God’s word, but have been summarily dismissed for preaching against the emergent church movement.

It is my prayer that you will provide clear answers to these questions and finally help many Nazarenes understand where our leadership stands on these issues. The church looks to you for guidance, yet those of us who see the scriptures as the only true authority for our faith and practice, must be Bereans and even hold you up to the standard of scripture.  It is not personal, it is only obedience to the Lord’s teachings that compels us to ask these questions.

May God bless you and I look forward to your response.

Sincerely in Christ,

Manny Silva

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(revised 09/21/14)

I am very proud to belong to the Facebook Group entitled “Concerned Nazarenes.” This Facebook Group was formed to fight against postmodern (Emerging/Emergent) heresies infiltrating the Church of the Nazarene (CotN) denomination.

The growth of Concerned Nazarenes is a great encouragement to me, although I am not a member of the CotN. I am attempting to fight Emerging/Emergent heresies primarily in the Evangelical Friends Church International (EFCI). Like Richard Foster (click here and here), I grew up in the EFCI (before Foster and others helped hijack it from its strongly  born again, separatist fundamentalist “Gurneyite” Quaker tradition).

“Progressive evangelical” EFCI institutions, particularly George Fox University and George Fox Evangelical Seminary, have been inviting Emerging/ Emergent heretics Richard Foster, Tony Campolo, Jason Clark, Todd Hunter, Dan Kimball, Brennan Manning, Brian McLaren, Leonard Sweet,  Dallas Willard, and many others to teach and/or speak on various occasions. (Also, click here for a Lighthouse Trails list of Emerging/Emergent names at George Fox University and George Fox Evangelical Seminary.)

To complicate matters further, pastors and professors are increasingly shared between the EFCI and non-evangelical Quaker denominations (nonchristian Quaker denominations that profess Christ as Lord and Teacher but not as Lord and Saviour). The non-evangelical Quaker denomination with the most ties to the EFCI is Friends United Meeting (FUM) – which has many Quaker universalists.

Also, the EFCI has joined various ecumenical Quaker organizations. For example, years ago colleges in the EFCI joined the Friends Association for Higher Education, along with non-evangelical Quaker institutions. My question is, why?

Apparently the EFCI has “become blind” doctrinally. The EFCI continues to increasingly reach out to nonchristian, non-evangelical Quaker pastors and professors with open arms. The thing that counts, to many in the EFCI, is that “they are Quakers”. For these EFCI individuals, it does not seem to matter whether their fellow Quakers (in these other Quaker branches) are born again, professing Christ as Lord and Saviour.

Amazingly, in spite of these accommodations by the EFCI of non-evangelical Quakers and Emerging/Emergent leaders, I have located very few EFCI members who are confronting their denomination regarding these heresies. Concerned EFCI readers, please don’t remain silent! (I have a feeling many concerned EFCI members have already quietly left the denomination and moved on to more biblically sound denominations.)

My point is this. Compared to the Church of the Nazarene, which is being strongly confronted by the Concerned Nazarenes Facebook Group and various individuals, the EFCI is being confronted by very few individuals. I realize there is a size difference in the denominations (approx. 2.1 million for the CotN as compared to approx. 140,000 worldwide for the EFCI). Yet, for such a small denomination, the EFCI has caused great harm to evangelicalism.  I pray that that members of the EFCI (and ex-members like myself) will speak out against its accommodation of non-evangelical Quakers and Emerging/Emergent teachings. (The EFCI is not alone – very few evangelical denominations today have any members who are actively protesting their slide into Emerging/Emergent and other heretical teachings.)

The Concerned Nazarenes Facebook Group serves as a great model for all individuals who are attempting to fight Emerging/Emergents in their quickly disintegrating denominations.

Now on to Manny Silva’s article about the Concerned Nazarenes Facebook Group. Click here for the original article. I have emphasized certain points by bolding, and inserted comments in [brackets]:

Who are Concerned Nazarenes? (posted by Manny Silva as a Doc in Facebook Group “Concerned Nazarenes” 08/09/11)

In August, 2008, Tim Wirth, a former drummer in several rock bands, helped coordinate an event featuring author Ray Yungen (“A Time of Departing, and “For Many Shall Come In My Name”), at the Piqua Church of the Nazarene in Ohio. Since joining the church, he’d become deeply concerned about emerging church philosophy that had crept into the Nazarene denomination – and wanted to alert others to the emergent movement.  Tim met Don and Sue Butler, long-time Nazarenes, who shared the same concerns – and Concerned Nazarenes was launched.

After several meetings and conversations with the Butlers, it was evident that the Holy Spirit had impressed upon their hearts to alert Nazarenes around the world to the emergent agenda.  Shortly after this, Nazarene evangelist Beverly Turner joined Concerned Nazarenes and gave the movement a voice.  Beverly shared the verse that would become the Concerned Nazarenes’ anthem:  “If the foundations are destroyed, what can the righteous do?” (Psalm 11:3)

Concerned Nazarenes has grown to include Nazarene pastors and evangelists across the United States – each grieved by the spiritual demise of our much-loved denomination under the influence of the emergent movement.  Concerned Nazarenes is a grassroots movement that serves to give voice to all those in the church that share our dismay at the direction in which the emergent movement is striving to guide Nazarene beliefs and practices.  In 2009, more than 500 Nazarenes across the United States delivered a petition to our General Superintendents, seeking clarification of their stance on the Emergent Church movement. Our fervent hope and prayer is that the General Superintendents will respond by purging our denomination of the emergent cancer before it is too late.

When will the Concerned Nazarene DVD be available?

The DVD, “The Emerging Church”, is now available. By the grace of God and the generosity of dedicated Nazarenes, this insightful DVD is being distributed free of charge.  When we consider that heresy cost our dear Savior His life, what is the price of one DVD?  To get a free copy, send a request to: standfortruthministries@gmail.com

Why are we so concerned?

Below, we list the specific concerns of our group, and on our web site we provide articles and links that give more depth to our concerns. Please read these carefully and prayerfully, as the future of the Nazarene Church is at stake.

1.  We are concerned about the authority of God’s Word being undermined.  We consider His Word to be inerrant (without error) in all matters.  The emerging church and a number of scholars within our academic institutions have a lower view of Scripture – often called “soteriological inerrancy*” – which we consider unacceptable.  We do not believe that this is the historical stance of the Church of the Nazarene. We are in full agreement with a resolution for our Article of Faith, “The Holy Scriptures,” that will be presented by the Southwest Indiana District at the General Assembly.  The resolution states that the “Old and New Testaments” are “inerrant throughout and the supreme authority on everything the scriptures teach.” In the words of the Psalmist, David: “Forever, O Lord, Your word is settled in Heaven” (Psalm 119:89).

2.  We are concerned about the teaching of Open Theism within our academic institutions. Open Theism basically teaches, among other heresies, that God cannot know the future if man is to have freedom of choice. The Apostle John wrote: “…God is greater than our heart, and knows all things” (I John 3:20). Furthermore, we are concerned about the teaching of evolution in our academic institutions, and the historic account of God’s creation being taught as allegorical.

3.  We are concerned about the invitations extended to emergent  teachers, such as Brian McLaren, Tony Jones and Doug Pagitt, to speak at our universities and colleges. Their stance on the essential doctrines of the Christian faith, such as sin, judgment and salvation, are a gross distortion of the truth. Because of required chapel attendance, emergent speakers have a captive audience and, as a result, students are forced to listen to emergent speakers or pay a fine if they choose to miss chapel. We are concerned for those who give financially and sacrificially to our academic institutions, expecting the values upon which our denomination was birthed to be upheld – not dismantled by emergent philosophy.

 4. We are concerned about experiential works-based techniques for prayer being promoted on and through our academic campuses. These practices – totally alien to our Wesleyan tradition – include prayer labyrinths, prayer stations and retreats to Roman Catholic monasteries. Most of these contemplative prayer practices are promoted under Spiritual Formation.

5.  We are concerned about the emergent ideology that our academic institutions and General Church within the United States are promoting. We ask a simple question: “Why are we giving a platform to those who would fabricate this falsehood, when the Gospel of Jesus Christ was and is and always will be the “power of God unto salvation” (Romans 1:16) for all mankind, and for every generation?” The emergent ideology is a perversion of the Word of God and the doctrine of the Church of the Nazarene.

6. We are concerned that the “Jesus” that the emergent movement is preaching is “another Jesus” (II Corinthians 11:4).  In the introduction to his book, “This Jesus,” Nazarene pastor W. E. McCumber writes:

“Let me tell you why I wrote this little book.  First of all, I love Jesus and I welcome any means of telling others about Him.  Second, I am troubled by “emergent theory” that is moving toward an “emergent church.”  Leaders of this “conversation” or “movement” call themselves “post-modern” and I guess if you need a tag that one is about as good as another. My concern about them springs from their distortions of Scripture and their diminishing of Jesus …. More disturbing to me is the fact that the Jesus they talk about is not the Jesus of Scripture …  Only the Jesus disclosed to us in the New Testament is relevant to our times and adequate for our salvation. To diminish Him is to destroy ourselves.”

We are in full agreement with Rev. McCumber and pray that you share our concerns.  If you do, please join us!

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