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Posts Tagged ‘Young Earth Creation’

(rough draft)

(image source: http://media-cache-ec0.pinimg.com/736x/10/b6/03/10b6034de0667891454f6fd8334e501c.jpg)

I have taken up stargazing recently, and am becoming very interested in Creation Astronomy (the biblically sound Young Earth Creation view which states that God created the Sun, Moon and stars on the fourth literal 24-hour day, about 6,000 years ago).

One of the questions that has occurred to me: what is the purpose of the stars? More specifically, why did God create so many stars?

Of course I should ask, who are we to question God’s actions and decisions? But as created beings with intelligence and an inquisitive mind, the question does occur to us.

A recently acquired Facebook Friend, Jay Ryan, points out that God created  the Sun, Moon and stars for “signs and seasons”. Jay has devoted an entire book  to explaining this in more detail.  Jay Ryan explains how God created the Sun, Moon and stars for “signs and seasons”, as the following Bible verse says:

“And God said, Let there be lights in the firmament of the heaven to divide the day from the night; and let them be for signs, and for seasons, and for days, and years:” (Gen. 1:14)

The above verse forms the basis of what Jay describes as Classical Astronomy. In this article he explains Classical Astronomy in more detail, and points out the faults in modern day secular astronomy.

But this question still puzzles me: why did God create so many stars? And what about distant objects in space? Is it wrong for mankind to research deep space, as is the emphasis today in secular astronomy? And what is the purpose of deep space objects? (Another question I hope to deal with in another blog: why did God create such a vast universe, yet create life on just one planet?)

Here a few thoughts off the top of my head, as to why God created such a vast universe with so many stars. I am searching for Bible verses to back up these points. The points are in no specific order, and there is some overlap:

1) For mankind’s pleasure

2) To show God’s awesome power (omnipotence, omniscience, omnipresence)

3) To show God’s grace and love for mankind

4) To humble mankind

5) To challenge mankind intellectually

At some point we have to sit back and say “my Lord and my God” and “we… just… don’t… know…” 99% of the answers. This one thing I know, our God is a truly awesome God. In the end we must admit, His creation of the Universe is truly beyond our comprehension.

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(revised 01/24/14)

Years ago I had the misfortune of attending public schools. In high school, we were taught evolution, and only evolution. No Creation Science was discussed, no Intelligent Design, nothing but pagan Darwinianism. Very few students complained or protested, and very few parents at the time homeschooled. So we settled uneasily for evolution without alternative.

Today we are blessed to have other options. Christian homeschooling parents can teach their children the Truth, the facts about Creation, with total religious freedom (for now, at least, in the U.S.).

But Christian parents beware. It’s becoming increasingly difficult to find Christian homeschool curricula which take a hardline stance against evolution and for the Truth. Which is, I believe, Young Earth Creation (YEC).

(image source: http://www.motherjones.com/files/legacy/mojoblog/creation_museum.jpg)

I came across several articles which reveal what some “Christian” homeschool publishers are now providing as alternatives to YEC.  {I have emphasized certain points by bolding, and inserted comments in [brackets].) In an 04/29/13 Christianity Today article, Sarah Eekhoff Zylstra wrote:

Christian homeschool science textbooks have long taught young earth creationism (YEC) almost exclusively. But observers say a growing number of parents want texts that also teach evolution. Some of these parents still believe in a young earth, says [BioLogos] program director Kathryn Applegate, but they want their children exposed to different perspectives. [BioLogos is extremely liberal.]

“Homeschooling has broadened so much, and now includes ,” said homeschool pioneer Susan Wise Bauer, a history professor at Virginia’s College of William and Mary. [Bauer is also extremely liberal.] “Also, there are a lot of younger evangelicals who have come to a different way of understanding Genesis, while still holding [on to their] evangelical roots.”

Numbers on the trend are hard to pin down. Still, BioLogos president Deborah Haarsma says that it’s “fairly common” for homeschooling families to request materials from her organization, which promotes theistic evolution. [Parents, take note – theistic evolution is heretical; do not order materials of any kind from this “Christian” organization.] Some of these parents still believe in a young earth, says program director Kathryn Applegate, but they want their children exposed to different perspectives. [If these parents “still believe in a young earth”, why are they giving their hard earned money for materials that blatantly espouse theistic evolution?]

American Scientific Affiliation

Doug Hayworth, coordinator of homeschool science resources for the American Scientific Affiliation, agrees. Inquiries to his Christian association reveal not a wave of old-earth converts, but instead frustrated young-earth believers who believe that “the standard [YEC] curricula … are very strident,” said Hayworth, who homeschools. “They’re looking for some advice.” [Again, I question the real beliefs of these parents. “Strident” – according to Merriam-Webster – is defined as “characterized by harsh, insistent, and discordant sound <a strident voice>; also : commanding attention by a loud or obtrusive quality.” What exactly is it about the Truth that they consider strident?]

Interesting. In an article entitled Weighing in on Ken Ham, Peter Enns and Jay Wile – Hayworth gives a great description of the “Christian evolution” conflict between these three men. But note this excerpt which shows ASA does not hold a YEC-only position: “…we do not promote only one specific position on science and faith topics. Although many ASA members have views akin to those of the BioLogos Foundation (some individual are members of both organizations), we represent a broad range of denominations, scientific disciplines and views of biblical interpretation in relation to science. This differentiates our mission from BioLogos’s mission. “ [I’m not sure how this makes ASA any better than BioLogos. Both question the validity of the YEC view – which is what counts.]

Sonlight Curriculum

Back to the Christianity Today article, which states:

Sonlight Curriculum is an exception [to the YEC-only curricula]. It offers a diversity of homeschool curricula that allow parents to teach various theories of origins. “The YEC position is strong and ingrained in the homeschool movement,” said Sonlight president Sarita Holzmann, who homeschools her children and believes in a young earth. “That might be to our detriment.” She says students need to be able to evaluate different positions.”

But does Sonlight hold strongly to the YEC position, as Sarita Holzmann claims that she believes? No! Check out this blog by “Robert”: Do Christian Homeschoolers “Embrace” Evolution?  Robert is connected with Sonlight. He never comes out and condemns “Christian” evolutionary theories. And this detailed article by Sonlight co-president John Holzmann (Sarita’s husband) questions whether we can even know that YEC is true.

This excerpt from Robert’s Sonlight blog does provide further leads concerning the views of several other Christian organizations (which perhaps publish homeschool curricula):

“Obviously, Christians reject non-theistic evolution because by definition that view excludes the supernatural and, with it, God.

But what about the other options? Young-earth creationism is promoted by organizations such as Answers in Genesis, old-earth creationism is held by Reasons to Believe, while theistic evolution is the view of Biologos. In addition, the Discovery Institute promotes what it calls Intelligent Design, which claims to remain neutral on the question of old versus young earth, but opposes theistic evolution and non-theistic evolution.”

BioLogos projects

Again, let’s look at the Christianity Today article. Here we find another red flag regarding BioLogos. Remember, BioLogos promotes theistic evolution:

With a recent grant from BioLogos, Turner and colleague Brian Eisenback, a biology professor, are writing a textbook that discusses the history of the science of origins, as well as different positions scientists have taken on Genesis and origins. They will include material on YEC, evolutionary creationism, intelligent design, and atheistic evolution.

And yet another red flag:

A similar BioLogos project is underway at Wheaton College, where five professors are working on a textbook covering the current scientific consensus on origins. [Will this textbook favor or oppose this “consensus”? Knowing that BioLogos favors theistic evolution, I’m guessing this upcoming “Christian” textbook will favor evolution-in-general.]

Sadly, Sarah Eekhoff Zylstra’s Christianity Today article does not condemn any “Christian” homeschooling publisher for pushing theistic evolution.

Besides BioLogos, I hope to locate other “Christian” homeschool publishers which are pushing theistic evolution and other non-YEC theories as the Truth. And mark my word, theistic evolution is an evolutionary theory; it is not Creation. Click here for one of many Christian discernment articles blasting theistic evolution as evolution-in-disguise.

Bottom line – It is an honorable thing for Christian homeschool publishers to prepare students for the world’s evolutionary arguments, by warning them about evolutionary theories.  (To its credit, the Christianity Today article does mention this practice of warning children.) But beware “Christian” homeschool publishers which cast doubt on YEC and discuss alternatives to YEC, claiming that an evolutionary alternative may be the truth.

FOR FURTHER READING

Articles exposing BioLogos publisher as being liberal:

Homeschool Controversy: Anti-Bible, Bible Curriculum! – This article mentions the liberal BioLogos publisher, as well as the liberal Peacehill Press. An excerpt: “I have watched anti-Bible books  infiltrate and grow in the homeschool movement over the years. Satan does not want us to teach our children truth. What better place to attack the Christians than to get to homeschool teachers. We are training the next Christian generation.”

Henry Morris III, An Inconvenient Truth – This article provides a good introduction to the various views of creation and evolution. Also, Dr. Morris mentions BioLogos.

Articles FAVORING the new wave of Christian homeschool textbooks including evolutionary theories:

List of BioLogos articles mentioning homeschooling

Evolution and Christianity: 1. Christian homeschooling parents dismayed by creationist textbooks, accommodationist books on the way

Peter Enns (a founder of BioLogos), Not All Homeschoolers Think Adam Had a Pet Dinosaur, Which is Good

David R. Wheeler, Old Earth, Young Minds: Evangelical Homeschoolers Embrace Evolution

The Old-Earth Christian homeschooling vacuum

Forum discussion: Books on creation, progressive creationism, and theistic evolution

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To find more articles on this issue, Google this search string:
[“homeschool” “evolution” “publishers”]

Also, try this search string:
[“homeschool convention” “evolution”]

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